Seeing the Environment through the Humanities

A New Window on Grand Societal Challenges

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EH-CH

Environmental Humanities Switzerland.

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Environmental Humanities

Environmental Humanities is a new interdisciplinary research field that explores environmental issues through the methods and insights of the humanities.
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Global Warming

The end of the world as we know it?

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Leopard Ecology & Conservation Symposium

We are delighted to invite you to a very interesting public lecture on leopards and lions. Monika Schiess and her team of Leopard Ecology & Conservation along with Prof. Dr. David Macdonald, Prof. Dr. Craig Packer and Dr. Michael Flyman will be there to talk to you on Wednesday 28 June, 2017. We also recommend participating in an informal lunchtime discussion (with free coffee and cake) on Conservation and Research in Botswana that following Friday. Take this opportunity to listen to these experts, and save the dates to attend the two events! We look forward to seeing you... read more

Environmental Humanities Fellowships available for PhD and Postdocs in Oslo, Norway

Description Three Doctoral or Postdoctoral Research Fellowships within the field of Environmental Humanities, connected to three ongoing research projects, are available at the Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages (IKOS), University of Oslo. Environmental Humanities is a rapidly expanding research field where scholars approach the study of man-made geological and atmospheric changes from the perspective of the humanities. IKOS now seeks to recruit three Doctoral or Postdoctoral candidates with excellent research qualifications who will investigate issues related to climate change and other environmental challenges that confront the planet and its inhabitants from the perspective of one or several humanistic academic disciplines, for instance, but not limited to, literary science, culture studies, history, anthropology, media science, linguistics, religious studies, Middle East studies, China studies, or other area studies. Please click here for additional... read more

Cosetta Veronese: ARE ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANISTS ALL TOO HUMAN?

… by pushing things even further, one might argue that the lable “Environmental Humanities” is itself problematic: in my understanding of the term, it makes the environment relate primarily (if not exclusively) to a human / humanistic sphere; it almost suggests that the environment is, as it were, a function of man, rather than man a function of the enviroment.

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Shifting Grounds: Literature, Culture and Spatial Phenomenologies

This international conference responds to the recent return of phenomenological perspectives in literary and cultural criticism, and in the field of spatiality in particular. It aims to probe how a focus on sensory impressions and “the perspective of experience” (Yi-Fu Tuan) can enhance our understanding of literary and cultural spaces. Questions of space and place have always been at the heart of phenomenological enquiry. Phenomenology played an important role in the first half of the twentieth century when philosophers like Martin Heidegger, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Henri Bergson privileged the embodied self of perception and lived experience over the rational self of Western philosophy. Heidegger’s focus on dwelling and being-in-the-world and Merleau-Ponty’s interest in the attainment of subjectivity through embodied spatiality prepared the ground for works of literary and cultural analysis like Gaston Bachelard’s study of intimate spaces in The Poetics of Space. Phenomenology fell out of grace with the advent of cultural semiotics, post-structuralism and postmodern theory, which critiqued phenomenology for its perceived privileging of a unified subjectivity and for its apparent bracketing of the social and ideological dimensions of space (as theorized by critics like Yuri Lotman, Henri Lefebvre, Michel Foucault, Edward Soja and Fredric Jameson). But phenomenology soon returned with a difference: already in the eighties, groundbreaking works like Michel de Certeau’s The Practice of Everyday Life and Paul Carter’s The Road to Botany Bay foregrounded the spatial practices of individuals precisely as a way of challenging and complicating the hierarchically produced and power-laden spaces of modernity. More recently, phenomenological perspectives have had a remarkable revival in a number of disciplines and theoretical movements interested in the... read more

Biohacking or Ecohacking?

Biohacking or Ecohacking?
… Artists and Scientists Merging Together in one Evening
June 7th, 2016, 18.00 – 19.30
Salotto Café, Hardturmstrasse 169, CH-8005 Zurich.

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Death Valley

‘Environmental Humanities’ (EH, Umwelt-Geisteswissenschaften / Sciences humaines de l’environnement / Scienze umane dell’ambiente) is a new interdisciplinary research field that explores environmental issues through the methods and insights of the humanities.  Historic, social, philosophical, and cultural insights offer fresh perspectives for addressing and understanding complex environmental problems.  This rapidly growing research field aims to identify effective, sustainable, and equitable ways of living within the earth’s natural limits.  Such areas as history, human geography, philosophy, ethics, literature and arts, ethnobotany, and law provide important venues for understanding environmental issues, but combining synergistic and novel insights of these fields in new ways is the promise of environmental humanities.  Natural sciences are also integral to environmental humanities, though not as ways to define environmental problems but as partners for enriching their humanistic understanding.

“The enormous scope and complexity of today’s environmental problems require knowledge derived from the natural and social sciences as well as the humanities”

Philippe Forêt

Co-Director SAGUF EH-CH, Researcher (associate), EBES, University of Zurich

Environmental Humanities

“The EH Working Group aims to join researchers from the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences from several Swiss universities working on both sides of the Röstigraben”

Christoph Kueffer

Co-director SAGUF EH-CH, ETH Zurich